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If the last thing you need is to try and convince your significant other of why you need to buy another motorcycle, then do yourself a favor and don’t ever get on a LiveWire S2 Del Mar. Because as soon as you do, you’re going to want one. Trust me, it happened to me.

Harley-Davidson’s electric motorcycle brand LiveWire has just reopened reservations this morning for its second electric motorcycle model, the S2 Del Mar. The first round of reservations opened back in May for the Launch Edition, but they sold out in 18 minutes.

The company let me get an early test ride before reservations reopened, and now I can’t imagine going back to my boring old life before this bike.

That’s not to say that the Del Mar is perfect, but the bike itself checks nearly all of my boxes. The only major downside is that it’s still a bit pricey, at least for a motorcycle that will admittedly be used largely in a commuter role by most riders.

It’s certainly more affordable than the $22,799 LiveWire One, which currently serves as the brand’s flagship electric motorcycle. LiveWire had hoped to launch the production version of the LiveWire S2 Del Mar at closer to $15,000, but inflation pressures and supply chain drama saw the price creep up to $16,999. That’s still a big move in the right direction compared to the LiveWire One’s price, but it still keeps it a bit out of reach of a lot riders.

If you can swing it though, you’re going to be glad you did. Take a look at my first ride video below showing off my morning ride on the S2 Del Mar. Then read on for all of the details.

LiveWire S2 Del Mar first ride video

Newly revealed Del Mar specs

In addition to opening up orders for the S2 Del Mar, LiveWire also revealed more concrete specs and performance figures.

The updated city range is listed at 110 miles (177 km) on a charge, and we also got more info about charging options. Both Level 1 (think: normal wall outlet charging) and Level 2 (think: public charging station) will be available on the bike, but there’s no Level 3 DC fast charging like on the LiveWire One.

Even so, the company says a Level 2 recharge of 20-80% (indicative of real-world charge stops) will take around 75 minutes. That’s longer than a coffee stop, but it means that a lunch stop or shopping trip could conceivably put a nearly full charge back into your “tank.”

We don’t have an exact power rating yet, but the bike has nearly equal off-the-line performance to the LiveWire One, scoring a 0-60 mph time of 3.1 seconds. And when putting the bike in Sport Mode, I can vouch for what that feels like. There’s no clutch or gear shifting to get in the way, either. You’re going from feet on the ground to flying at 60 mph in barely the time it takes to say, “well I’ll be damned.”

The 418 pound (189.6 kg) Del Mar is a bit lighter than the 560 pound (254 kg) LiveWire One, so with the same acceleration times then it stands to reason that it will have a slightly lower power rating than the LiveWire One’s 78 kW motor.

LiveWire hasn’t announced the Del Mar’s top speed, but let’s just say it’s higher than you’ll ever need. I got it up to speeds that I had no business reaching on a New York highway and it seemed to have plenty of room to keep going. I wasn’t about to risk my license (or a speeding ticket on a bike I didn’t own) by pushing my luck any further than I already had, but suffice it to say that whatever the top speed is, there’s no road in America that you’ll be able to legally hit it.

For me, the Del Mar felt like a Goldilocks bike. It’s got a shorter reach than the LiveWire One, meaning you’re sitting more upright and don’t feel like you’re leaning out forward over the tank to grab the bars. But it’s also not too small either, and gives you enough height over the pegs that your legs aren’t tucked up underneath you. It’s no cruiser, but it’s at least closer to that end of the comfort spectrum.

I’m a more relaxed type of rider, anyway. As much fun as it can be crouching into an Italian sport bike, I’m much more at home in a comfortable upright position. And so the S2 Del Mar speaks to me.

In fact, I thought the Del Mar would be smaller than it was. Each time I looked at images of the Arrow platform, which is basically the structural battery and motor combo that the Del Mar is built on, it all just looked so compact. But the bike still has serious presence when you walk up and throw a leg over it. No one is going to think you’re on a small bike.

And when you blow them away at a traffic light, leaving them in your dust, they’ll be sure you weren’t on a small bike.

When it comes to battery capacity, we’re still left in the dark. LiveWire isn’t spilling the beans on that info just yet.

Based on the 110-mile city range offered by the company, and the Level 2 recharge time from 20 to 80% in 75 minutes, I’d wager that the battery will fall in the 9.5 to 10.5 kWh range. But that’s just an educated guess at this point.

What I can tell you is that I did around 40 miles (64 km) on the bike and used 55% of the battery, equating to a mixed range of approximately 73 miles (117 km). That ride included everything from city traffic to unreasonably fast highway speeds, so that’s probably a pretty fair “mixed” range figure. If you’re actually doing city riding or at least keeping it under 55 mph or so, that 110-mile range figure is likely within reach.

Between my city and highway riding, the Del Mar felt equally at home in both worlds. It’s small and light enough to be a nimble city ride, yet large and powerful enough to be comfortable on any interstate.

The one thing that felt a bit lacking was any sort of sound. To be fair, I was testing the bike in and around New York City, and so the city cacophony was never going to allow the nuisance of a modest direct drive electric motor whine through. But with a pair of LiveWire Ones on either side of me during much of the ride, I could hear their motors more than I could hear my own.

To be honest, the LiveWire One has always been a bit louder than I’d prefer. It’s got a cool sound to it, and the mechanics of the bevel gear that produce that sound add to the coolness. But when you really lean into it you get a fairly loud signature sound. The Del Mar, on the other hand, is so quiet that I couldn’t really hear it in the city. It left me wanting a little more auditory feedback. But perhaps if I had been in a quieter area, I would have heard what I was looking for.

Even so, the fact that the three of us (including my two LiveWire ride partners Chris and Jon) could all carry on a conversation while riding is testament to how much nicer it is to be on quiet electric motorcycles than rumbling ICE bikes.

All in all, I had a blast riding the LiveWire S2 Del Mar and came away majorly impressed.

I had initially expected to find a downgraded LiveWire One, when instead I was presented with a bike that rivals the LiveWire One’s performance, yet in a more comfortable and manageable package.

Sure, the LiveWire One will still have more range from its larger battery and faster recharging times with its DC fast charging ability. And if you want to go on cross-country rides, that’s the better bike. But for someone that just wants a missile on wheels for cruising the city and local highways, then the S2 Del Mar is the ticket.

It nestles itself right in between bikes like the Zero FXE and Zero DSR when it comes to price and range, meaning it gives a nice option for a middleweight electric bike with more range than pretty much any commuter should need, yet at a price that doesn’t blow past $20K and into flagship electric motorcycle territory.

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Would you rather have one $50k EV or 50 of these $1k Chinese electric cars

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Would you rather have one k EV or 50 of these k Chinese electric cars

Panning for gold in Alibaba’s electric vehicle catalog is bound to find some real doozies, such as this week’s Awesomely Weird Alibaba Electric Vehicle of the Week. Meet this fun little purple three-wheeled electric car that barely manages to fulfill the requirements of a car.

The “Minitype 3 Seater Passenger Electric Passenger Tricycle” is quite a mouthful of a name, but what’s really important here are the specs.

With a single driver’s seat up front and a narrow bench in back, there is theoretically space for three souls aboard this thing. There’s no steering wheel up front, though. Instead, drivers operate the handlebar that controls the front wheel through a fork instead of traditional automotive linkage to two wheels. Think of it like an enclosed tuk-tuk.

That’s probably fine based on the rather low performance of the machine, reaching just 40 km/h (25 mph) and likely taking its sweet time to do so.

It may not seem spacious, but this is one of those “the seats go aaaalllllllllll the way back” kind of cars. Or at least, the one seat.

I’m not sure what kind of freedom or bonus points that buys you, unless your date is super into trikes. But let’s just say that the car is doing everything it can to be a good wingman for you.

If you can’t pick up chicks in this babe magnet, then you’re obviously doing something wrong.

The coolest part about this thing though is the price. Sure, if you try to buy just a single car then it’s a bit expensive at US $1,200. But if you’ll take 15 units then you can knock that price down to $1,100. An order of up to 49 gets you down to an even $1,000.

So which would you rather have? One $50k electric car or 50 $1k electric cars? Well let me answer that for myself with another question. How easy is it to start a Chinese EV racing league in your backyard track with just one $50k EV?

Ok, jokes aside, please don’t anyone try to actually order one of these. This glorified mobility scooter is likely sans batteries for that price, plus you’ll absolutely spend several times the supposed purchase price just to try and get it shipped out of China.

Then there’s the wrinkle of these not being street-legal anywhere outside of China, and potentially not even there.

So let’s just enjoy them from the safe distance of our computer screens, shall we? In the meantime, I’ll appreciate even more the electric mini-truck I actually DID buy from China.

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GE scraps plans to make giant 18 MW offshore wind turbines

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GE scraps plans to make giant 18 MW offshore wind turbines

GE Vernova is abandoning plans to supersize its offshore wind turbines and will instead focus on rolling out smaller “workhorse” turbines.

In March of last year, GE Vernova CEO Scott Strazik said during a GE Investor Conference that the market was receptive to larger variants of the company’s Haliade-X offshore wind turbines: “Now we are getting a very positive reception from the market with our 17 to 18 MW Haliade-X variant off of what we’re shipping this year.”

However, GE Vernova has decided to shelve that idea for the future. Parent company GE writes in its US Securities and Exchange Commission EX-99 that its Haliade-X platform has included “offerings available from 12 MW to 18 MW with estimated capacity factors ranging from 60% to 64%.” It continued:

One Haliade-X 13 MW turbine can power the equivalent of up to 16,000 European homes.

…We believe the future of our offshore wind business will be the Haliade-X 15.5 MW-250, a workhorse product.

The company made project losses in its offshore wind business last year. It expects margins to remain challenged in 2024 as it executes its Haliade-X backlog, “which will require significant cash use and working capital.” However, GE anticipates working capital dynamics and margins to improve beyond 2024.

The 800 MW Vineyard Wind I project off the Massachusetts coast consists of GE’s 13 MW Haliade-X turbines.

Read more: 5 wind turbines just came online at Massachusetts’ first offshore wind farm


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Jeep’s first EV will land in the US as early as July, electric Wrangler-like Recon to follow

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Jeep's first EV will land in the US as early as July, electric Wrangler-like Recon to follow

The first all-electric Jeep could be delivered to US customers as soon as July. According to new CEO Antonio Filosa, production of Jeep’s first EV, the Wagoneer S SUV, is expected to begin in Q2. Deliveries could happen as soon as the third quarter. Jeep’s CEO also confirmed we may see the electric Wrangler-like Recon launch by the end of the year.

The first Jeep EV could reach US buyers as early as Q3

After slashing prices amid slumping sales Friday (including up to $4K on its best-selling Grand Cherokee), Filosa admitted more needs to be done to fend off incoming competition.

Jeep is facing new rivals like the Rivian R1S, which was the seventh best-selling EV in the US last year. Volkswagen’s off-road Scout brand is also set to launch its first EVs soon.

Jeep’s first EV in the US, the Wagoneer S SUV, is expected to enter production in the second quarter. Filosa said the first deliveries could happen as early as the third quarter. Ahead of its official launch, Jeep is hyping the electric SUV with new teasers.

You can see Jeep’s iconic design evolving as it shifts to electric. Jeep claims the Wagoneer S will be “lightning fast,” packing 600 hp for a 0 to 60 mph sprint in 3.5 seconds.

Jeep-Wagoneer-S-leaked
Jeep Wagoneer S electric SUV teaser (Source: Jeep)

It will be the first EV based on parent company Stellantis’ new STLA Large platform. Jeep aims for around 400 miles range, rivaling Rivian’s R1S.

Jeep also showed the first glimpse of the EV’s interior, which has plenty of buttons and digital screens. You can see a custom driver control center with Jeep’s signature Selec-Terrain toggle.

It also includes a standard dual-pane panoramic sunroof and a premium 19-speaker McIntosh audio system.

Jeep’s electric Wrangler-like Recon launching soon

Filsosa confirmed Jeep’s electric Wrangler-like Recon could launch by the end of the year, although the timing is still unclear.

We’ve already seen a sneak peek of the Recon Moab 4xe after images leaked out of a dealer event in Las Vegas.

Jeep's-electric-Wrangler-like-Recon
Jeep Recon Moab 4xe (source: Jeep Recon Forum)

The Recon will be a “rugged and fully capable electric SUV” inspired by the off-road Jeep Wrangler. Previous head of Jeep North America, Jim Morrison, said the Recon EV “has the capability to cross the mighty Rubicon Trail.” Not only that, it will “reach the end of the trail with enough range to drive back to town and recharge,” Morrison claimed.

Jeep's-electric-Wrangler-like-Recon
2024 electric Jeep Recon (Source: Stellantis)

Filosa confirmed the Recon will also be based on the STLA Large platform, suggesting at least 600 hp is likely.

The platform serves between 85 and 118 kWh battery pack options with up to 500 mi (800 km) range for sedans. It will also come with 400V and 800V options.

Stellantis claims the platform includes “extreme power,” claiming it will “outperform any of the existing Hellcat V-8s.” More powerful models can sprint from 0 to 62 mph (0-100km/hr) in the 2-second range, according to Stellantis.

According to the new UAW agreements, an electric Jeep Wrangler is also expected to launch, but not until 2028. Jeep’s best-selling Grand Cherokee will also get an all-electric option around 2027.

Source: Detroit News

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