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Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has said whenever we see racism “we must confront it” following the race row engulfing Buckingham Palace.

A black domestic abuse campaigner from London said she was repeatedly asked where she “really came from” by Prince William‘s godmother during a reception at the palace this week.

Although he refused to comment directly on the incident or anything to do with the monarchy, Mr Sunak said he has experienced racism but does not think what he experienced as a child would happen today – however, there is still work to be done.

“Our country’s made incredible progress in tackling racism,” he said.

“But the job is never done. And that’s why whenever we see it, we must confront it.

“And it’s right that we continually learn the lessons and move to a better future.”

Lady Susan Hussey, who was the Queen’s lady-in-waiting for more than 60 years, resigned from her role in the royal household and apologised over the incident during an event held on Tuesday by the Queen Consort.

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Ngozi Fulani, chief executive of charity Sistah Space, said Lady Hussey moved her hair to see her name badge and asked her “what part of Africa” she was from after she told her several times she was British.

The charity boss earlier today told Sky News she felt abused, verbally attacked and “trapped” when Lady Hussey kept asking her where she was “really from”.

Ms Fulani described the exchange with Lady Hussey, who was made a lady of the household after the Queen’s death, as a “violation” and said it was abuse when she moved her hair.

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‘Institutional racism’ at palace

“I was not giving the answer that she wanted me to give. And so we could not move on,” Ms Fulani told Sky News.

“And it was when she said ‘I knew you’d get there in the end’ – that proved to me, you were determined to prove that I had no right to British citizenship.

“Now, that reminds me of the Windrush conversation, where 50 or 60 years on people who were born here, worked here or you know, have given so much, can just be thrown out.

“Now, abuse doesn’t have to be physical. But if you move my hair without permission, to me, that’s abuse.

Ngozi Fulani and Lady Susan Hussey. Pics: PA/David Fisher/Shutterstock
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Ngozi Fulani and Lady Susan Hussey. Pics: PA/David Fisher/Shutterstock

“When you verbally attack, because that to me is what it is – you are determined that the answer that I gave you is not one you want to hear, you do not recognise me as British.

“And until I acknowledge that I’m not, you’re not going to stop. What do I do? What do I do at that point? So I become silent. And I hoped she would go away and she eventually did.”

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Harry and Meghan’s documentary trailer released
Who is Lady Susan Hussey?

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Why Will and Kate’s US trip matters

Prince William, who is on a three-day US visit with his wife Kate, is understood to agree it was right for Lady Hussey to step down from her honorary role as Lady of the Household with immediate effect.

A Kensington Palace spokesman told reporters in the US before the Prince and Princess of Wales’ Boston trip – which has been overshadowed by the palace controversy – that Lady Hussey’s comments were “unacceptable” and “racism has no place in our society”.

Later, during an NBA game William and Kate attended, the royal couple were booed by some members of the crowd, and at an Earthshot Prize event, they heard a speech on race equality by a black reverend.

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Tyre Nichols: Last words of US man who died after police ‘beating’ were ‘mum, mum, mum’, says lawyer

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Tyre Nichols: Last words of US man who died after police 'beating' were 'mum, mum, mum', says lawyer

The final words of a US motorist who died after he was allegedly beaten by five police officers were “mum, mum, mum”, according to a lawyer.

Tyre Nichols, 29, passed away in hospital three days after the confrontation following a traffic stop in the city of Memphis, Tennessee, on 7 January.

Bodycam footage of the altercation is expected to be released later on Friday evening.

His family said the “very horrific” video showed officers savagely beating the FedEx worker for three minutes in an assault their lawyers likened to the Los Angeles police attack on motorist Rodney King in 1991.

Tyre Nichols
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Tyre Nichols

Five sacked officers, who are all black, have been charged with second-degree murder and other crimes, including assault, kidnapping, official misconduct and official oppression, over Mr Nichols’s death.

Civil rights lawyer Ben Crump, who is representing his family, said when the public watches the footage they will see him calling out for his mother.

He said: “When you all see this video, you’re going to see Tyre Nichols calling out for his mum.

“He calls out three times for his mother. His last words on this earth are, ‘mum, mum, mum’. He’s screaming for her. When you think about that kidnapping charge, he said ‘I just want to go home’.”

“It’s a traffic stop for God’s sake. A simple traffic stop.”

RowVaughn Wells, mother of Tyre Nichols. Pic: AP
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RowVaughn Wells, the mother of Tyre Nichols. Pic: AP

Mr Nichols’s mother, RowVaughn Wells, told reporters: “For a mother to know their child was calling them in their need and I wasn’t there for him. Do you know how I feel right now? Because I wasn’t there for my son.”

Ms Wells recalled she had “a really bad pain in my stomach” and once she found out what happened she realised “that was my son’s pain that I was feeling”.

“For me to find out my son was calling my name, you have no clue how I feel right now,” she added, struggling to hold back tears.

Clockwise from top left: Demetrius Haley, Desmond Mills Jr, Emmitt Martin III, Tadarrius Bean and Justin Smith have been sacked
Image:
Clockwise from top left: Demetrius Haley, Desmond Mills Jr, Emmitt Martin III, Tadarrius Bean and Justin Smith have been sacked

She also said she had not yet seen the video but urged anyone with children not to let them watch it.

“I have never seen the video but what I have heard is very horrific.”

She added the charged officers had “disgraced their families”.

“I want to say to the five police officers who murdered my son, you also disgraced your own families when you did this.

“But I am going to pray for you and your families. Because this shouldn’t have happened. We want justice for my son.”

She has pleaded for peaceful protests.

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Police pulled Mr Nichols over for alleged reckless driving before there was an “altercation” where officers used pepper spray on him, according to Shelby County district attorney Steve Mulroy.

Mr Nichols then tried to flee on foot and another altercation followed, he added.

His family say the officers beat him and the injuries he sustained during the encounter led to his death.

Relatives accuse police of causing him to have a heart attack and kidney failure. Authorities have only said he experienced a medical emergency.

The officers were assigned to the ‘scorpion’ unit which focuses on violent street crime. The family’s lawyers want it to be disbanded.

Memphis police chief Cerelyn Davis has said the department will review scorpion and other specialised units.

President Joe Biden said the Nichols family and the city of Memphis deserve “a swift, full and transparent investigation”.

“Public trust is the foundation of public safety, and there are still too many places in America today where the bonds of trust are frayed or broken,” he added.

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Palestinian militants ‘ready to die’ as prospect of all-out war increases after West Bank clashes

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Palestinian militants 'ready to die' as prospect of all-out war increases after West Bank clashes

The alleyways that run inside the Balata refugee camp are narrow, claustrophobic and full of uncollected rubbish.

Posters celebrating dead militants are stuck to the walls. Children are everywhere – more than half the population of the camp is under 25.

We were escorted to meet fighters from Al Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigade, one of the largest and oldest militant groups in the West Bank.

They are a proscribed terror group by Israel, the EU and US, but not the UK.

Out front, I turned a corner and they were there – dressed all in black, M16 assault rifles in hand and balaclavas covering their faces.

They are young men, heavily armed and say they are ready to die defending their land.

We made our introductions and then moved down another alleyway – an Israeli military lookout post was on the hill above us; snipers watch every move in the camp below.

“We’re seeing an escalation by the [Israeli] occupation forces across camps in the West Bank, especially in Jenin and Balata,” one of the militants tells me.

“Most of the operations are carried out by the Israeli special forces. Yesterday, two of our men were killed in clashes when they entered inside the camp.”

The fighters are relaxed. This is their stronghold.

CCTV cameras seem to be everywhere, they joke it’s like Paris or London; the militia has its own reconnaissance unit that watches for undercover Israeli special forces entering the camp.

Violent clashes have been more frequent in recent months – 2022 was the deadliest year since 2005 and already 2023, only a few weeks old, is more deadly still.

After nine Palestinians, mostly militants, were killed in an Israeli counter-terror raid on Thursday, the prospect of another all-out war is closer.

One of those killed was a 61-year old woman, Magda Obaid, caught in the crossfire.

The IDF says it’s investigating her death, but the list of unexplained civilian fatalities is growing.

“I think because of the policies of the right-wing Israeli government there will be an escalation in the West Bank,” the militant from Al Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades predicts.

Ibrahim Ramadan, governor of Nablus
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Ibrahim Ramadan, governor of Nablus, says people have ‘no hope’
Poster in old city
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A poster of dead militants hangs above a fruit and veg stall

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Tensions rise as Israel hardens policies towards Palestinians

Talk of a new uprising, a third intifada, which has been so often threatened in recent years, is emerging again.

“I think that there is an intifada coming,” Ibrahim Ramadan, governor of Nablus tells me.

“Why? There is not any hope among my people. The Palestinian people need hope, small hope for their freedom.”

The deputy mayor of Nablus, Dr Husam Shakhshiris, is more sanguine but equally blunt in his assessment of the current situation.

“It [Nablus] is occupied by the state of Israel. The Israeli army is entering the city everyday,” he says.

“We have two military camps on top [of the surrounding hills], we have seven settlements surrounding Nablus city connected by bus routes, and it’s easy for the Israelis to close the city and prevent the movement in and out of the city.”

As we walk around the city together, Dr Husam is clearly popular. Residents stop to greet him.

Unlike the militants we met, he has the wisdom of age and is thoughtful and considered in his words, but no less damning of Israel.

“How bad is it?” I ask him.

Dr Husam Shakhshiris
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Nablus’s deputy mayor says the current situation is the worst he’s ever seen

“This is bad. I see all the time in the past that there was hope to have a peace solution, to have a two-state solution implemented, especially after Oslo,” says Dr Husam.

“Now we don’t see this hope, we don’t see a peaceful solution and we are stuck in these contours created by the policies of the state of Israel. They don’t see or recognise our national right of self-determination.

“It is the worst situation in my life.”

Violence in Israel and the West Bank goes in cycles.

Right now, any prospect of peace talks, or even a two-state solution, feels a long way off.

Neither side is in the mood to talk or to compromise, and so for many Palestinians fighting seems like the only route to more freedoms.

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Seven dead after shooting at synagogue in Jerusalem, Israeli police say

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Seven dead after shooting at synagogue in Jerusalem, Israeli police say

Seven people have been killed and several injured in a shooting at a synagogue in Jerusalem, according to Israeli police.

The gunman was shot and killed and a large police presence was at the scene.

Several others were injured in the shooting, including a 70-year-old woman in critical condition and a 14-year-old boy in serious condition, the medical service said.

Israeli police described it as a “terror attack” and said it took place in a synagogue in Neve Yaakov, considered by Israelis to be a neighbourhood within Jerusalem, while Palestinians and most of the international community consider it occupied land illegally annexed after the Six-Day War in 1967.

They said the attacker was a “terrorist who was neutralised by the police force” and described him as a 21-year-old resident of East Jerusalem who “carried out the attack at the scene alone”.

Forensic experts check a body. Pic: AP
Image:
Forensic experts check a body. Pic: AP

It comes after a deadly raid by the Israeli military yesterday that killed nine Palestinians in the occupied West Bank. A 10th was later killed north of Jerusalem.

Gaza militants then fired rockets and Israel responded with air strikes overnight. There were no reports of injuries.

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Earlier today Palestinians marched in anger as they buried the last of the people killed by Israeli fire.

A map of Neve Yaakov, where the shooting took place

Hamas spokesperson Hazem Qassem told Reuters: “This operation is a response to the crime conducted by the occupation in Jenin and a natural response to the occupation’s criminal actions”, though he stopped short of claiming the attack.

The Palestinian Islamic Jihad also praised but did not claim the attack.

Israeli forces work at the scene of the shooting in Neve Yaakov
Israeli security forces move a body as they work at the scene of the shooting in Neve Yaakov

Speaking from near the scene Sky correspondent Alistair Bunkall said: “We’ve seen some ambulances leaving the scene as we’ve been here in the last half an hour or so.

“Things are incredibly tense. There have been flashbangs set off just up the road from us in the Palestinian neighbourhood.”

“And it comes of course on International Holocaust Memorial Day, the attack happened just hours after the start of Shabbat, the Israeli day of rest, and it comes barely 24 hours after 10 people were killed in the West Bank yesterday, including nine in an Israeli special forces raid in the northern West Bank city of Jenin.”

Israeli forces stand guard near the scene of the shooting
Image:
Israeli forces stand guard near the scene of the shooting

The United States condemned the “apparent terrorist attack”, with US State Department deputy spokesperson Vedant Patel said he did not expect changes to Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s visit to Israel next week.

“This is absolutely horrific. Our thoughts, prayers and condolences go out to those killed by this heinous act of violence. We condemn this apparent terrorist attack in the strongest terms. Our commitment to Israel’s security remains ironclad,” he said.

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