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The New York Stock Exchange welcomes executives and guests of Roblox in celebration of its direct listing, March 10, 2021.

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Roblox reported results for the fiscal fourth quarter Wednesday that beat consensus estimates on the top and bottom lines. Shares were up 12% in morning trading.

Here’s how the company did:

  • Losses per share: 52 cents vs. 55 cents expected by analysts, according to LSEG, formerly Refinitiv.
  • Revenue (bookings): $1.13 billion vs. $1.08 billion expected, according to LSEG.

The revenue figure is what Roblox calls bookings, a category that includes sales recognized during the quarter and deferred revenue. 

The video game developer generates revenue from sales of its virtual currency called Robux, which players use to dress up their avatars and buy other premium in-game features.

Roblox also reported full-year revenue of $3.52 billion, versus an LSEG consensus estimate of $3.41 billion. The company’s full-year loss per share was $1.87, compared with a consensus estimate of $1.91.

Roblox’s quarterly bookings hit $1.13 billion — the company’s highest ever.

“We enter 2024 with even more conviction of being able to achieve our long-term goal of attracting over 1 billion daily active users with optimism and civility,” Roblox CEO David Baszucki said in a release. The company reported average daily active users, or DAUs, of 71.5 million for the quarter, up 22% compared with the year-ago period.

Roblox’s average DAUs have grown for the past two quarters, after stalled growth in the back half of fiscal year 2022 and a slight slip between the first and second fiscal quarters of 2023.

Average bookings per daily active user increased 3% to $15.75, mirroring a bump that Roblox has historically seen in its fiscal fourth quarter.

“We’re seeing strength, both international as well as older players on the platform,” CEO Baszucki told CNBC’s Steve Kovach, pointing to double-digit growth in both the 13-and-up segment and non-U.S. & Canada segment. “Those are good trends, because those are really big cohorts,” Baszucki said.

The number of engaged hours for users fell from 16 million for the third quarter of 2023 to 15.5 million during the fourth quarter. Still, it represents a 21% spike compared with the year-ago period.

The company provided guidance for 2024 and the first fiscal quarter. The company expects first-quarter bookings between $910 million and $940 million, and a net loss ranging from $342 million to $347 million. It guided to full-year 2024 bookings between $4.1 billion and $4.28 billion, higher than the consensus range of $3.4 billion to $4.27 billion, and a net loss of between $1.37 billion and $1.4 billion.

Personnel costs continue to weigh on the company, although they’ve grown at a slower rate than bookings have. Excluding share-based compensation, quarterly personnel costs grew 24% year over year from $160 million to $198 million, with the sharpest increases reflected in Roblox’s infrastructure and trust and safety teams.

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OpenAI says in memo that Musk’s claims ‘stem from Elon’s regrets’ that he’s not part of company

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OpenAI says in memo that Musk's claims ‘stem from Elon’s regrets’ that he’s not part of company

Sam Altman, CEO of OpenAI, at the Hope Global Forums annual meeting in Atlanta on Dec. 11, 2023.

Dustin Chambers | Bloomberg | Getty Images

OpenAI executives disputed claims Elon Musk laid out in a lawsuit on Thursday, and said the Tesla CEO is upset that he’s no longer part of the artificial intelligence startup.

“We believe the claims in this suit may stem from Elon’s regrets about not being involved with the company today,” wrote OpenAI Chief Strategy Officer Jason Kwon in an internal memo on Friday that was viewed by CNBC. “It is deeply disappointing to see Elon take this action against a company he helped start, especially given his close collaboration with some of you who are still here working towards the mission.”

Musk co-founded OpenAI in 2015 and stepped down from its board in 2018, four years after saying that AI is “potentially more dangerous than nukes.”

Musk is now suing Microsoftbacked OpenAI and CEO Sam Altman, among others, alleging they abandoned the company’s founding mission to develop artificial intelligence “for the benefit of humanity broadly.”

Since releasing the ChatGPT chatbot to the public in late 2022, OpenAI has become one of the hottest startups on the planet, with a valuation reportedly over $80 billion. The company’s convoluted “capped-profit” structure resulted in Altman being briefly ousted by the board late last year, before an uproar among investors and employees led to his quick reinstatement.

Musk has long wanted recognition for his central role in the creation of OpenAI, and he spent large chunks of the lawsuit telling his version of events. His lawyers said in the suit that Musk was approached in 2015 by Altman and OpenAI co-founder Greg Brockman and agreed to form a nonprofit lab that would develop artificial general intelligence, or AGI, outside of the corporate sphere.

Musk’s attorneys said their client contributed over $15 million to OpenAI in 2016, which was “more than any other donor” and helped the startup build a team of “top talent.” The next year, Musk gave nearly $20 million to OpenAI, which the attorneys reiterated was more than other backers. In total, Musk invested over $44 million into OpenAI from 2016 through September 2020, according to the suit.

Additionally, Musk leased OpenAI’s initial office space “and paid the monthly rental expenses,” the suit said. He was also “present for important company milestones.”

Kwon didn’t dispute Musk’s central role in the early days of OpenAI, but he added some other details. For example, Kwon wrote that Musk at one point indicated he needed “full initial control and majority equity” and later suggested that OpenAI merge with Tesla.

“We did not think either approach was right for the mission,” Kwon wrote.

In the memo, Altman called Musk a hero of his and said the he misses the old version of his co-founder. But he said the company’s mission continues.

While it’s the first time the dispute between the two sides has resulted in a fiery lawsuit, they’ve been at odds for a while.

Before he split with OpenAI, Tesla hired co-founder Andrej Karpathy as senior director of AI. Karpathy returned to OpenAI in 2023. And Musk has been notably vocal in his opposition to OpenAI and its Microsoft partnership in recent years, stating publicly in November that OpenAI had deviated from its original mission.

“OpenAI should be renamed ‘super closed source for maximum profit AI,’ because this is what it actually is,” Musk said onstage at The New York Times’ DealBook conference. Regarding OpenAI’s transformation from an “open source foundation” to a multibillion-dollar for-profit company, Musk said, “I don’t know, is this legal?”

Kwon insisted on Friday that OpenAI is independent and continues to work “to ensure AGI benefits all of humanity.”

Musk’s lawyers didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

— CNBC’s Lora Kolodny and Hayden Field contributed to this report

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Waymo approved by regulator to expand robotaxi service in Los Angeles, San Francisco Peninsula

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Waymo approved by regulator to expand robotaxi service in Los Angeles, San Francisco Peninsula

Passengers ride in an electric Waymo full self-driving technology in Santa Monica

Allen J. Schaben | Los Angeles Times | Getty Images

Alphabet’s Waymo robotaxi unit won approval from the California Public Utilities Commission to expand service to parts of Los Angeles and the Bay Area, according to a notice posted to the regulator’s website on Friday.

“Waymo may begin fared driverless passenger service operations in the specified areas of Los Angeles and the San Francisco Peninsula, effective today,” the release said.

In mid-February, Waymo initiated a voluntary recall filing notice with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, saying it would fix software issues. The recall followed two previously undisclosed incidents that occurred in Phoenix on Dec. 11, in which unmanned Waymo vehicles crashed into the same towed pickup truck within minutes of each other.

The collisions added to existing concerns about autonomous vehicle use in California. Competing taxi and transit service providers and labor activists are worried about the loss of drivers’ jobs, while safety advocates wrote letters to regulators and politicians asking them to thwart Waymo’s expansion in the state.

The CPUC in February had suspended Waymo’s expansion efforts for up to 120 days to provide for added review time.

In its letter on Friday, the regulator said it was approving the new proposal, due in part to “Waymo’s updated Passenger Safety Plan (PSP), submitted in connection with its expanded operational design domain (ODD) for deployment,” which was also approved by the California Department of Motor Vehicles.

“We’re grateful to the CPUC for this vote of confidence in our operations, which paves the way for the deployment of our commercial Waymo One service in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Peninsula,” a Waymo spokesperson said in a statement.

Waymo’s progress in California comes after General Motors-owned Cruise and Apple bowed out of the autonomous vehicle business in California, while Elon Musk’s Tesla has yet to develop an autonomous vehicle that can safely operate without a human driver at the controls.

California regulators halted operations of self-driving Cruise robotaxis in October after a series of incidents, including one that resulted in a robotaxi rolling over a pedestrian who had first been hit by a human-driven car and was then pulled forward about 20 feet by the Cruise vehicle.

Waymo’s new approvals allow the company’s robotaxis to operate close to Tesla’s Palo Alto engineering headquarters in San Mateo County.

The latest notice applies to the commercial ride-sharing service Waymo One. The company has deployed testing vehicles in those areas for several years.

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Super Micro joining S&P 500 after stock price soars more than 20-fold in two years

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Super Micro joining S&P 500 after stock price soars more than 20-fold in two years

David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Super Micro Computer is joining the S&P 500 following a historic rally in the stock that has pushed the company’s market cap past $50 billion.

The shares, up more than 20-fold in the past two years and over 200% just since the start of 2024, climbed another 8% in extended trading on Friday.

Super Micro is replacing Whirlpool, according to a press release. Deckers Outdoor is also joining the S&P 500, replacing Zions Bancorporation.

Stocks added to the benchmark index often rise in value because funds that track the S&P 500 will add it to their portfolios. The median market cap for companies in the S&P 500 is $33.7 billion.

Super Micro has been one of the main beneficiaries of the artificial intelligence boom sweeping the technology industry. The company makes servers and other computer infrastructure, and it’s one of the primary vendors for building out Nvidia-based “clusters” of servers for training and deploying AI models.

In the quarter that ended December, Super Micro’s revenue more than doubled to $3.66 billion. Analysts expect sales in the current quarter to more than triple.

“We see Nvidia’s results as a positive data point for SMCI which is one of the leading partners that designs and manufactures servers to wrap around the GPUs and customizes racks to the specific needs of a customer,” Bank of America analyst Ruplu Bhattacharya wrote in a note last month. He has a buy rating on the stock.

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