Connect with us

Published

on

The British aid workers who died in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza have been named as John Chapman, James Kirby and James Henderson.

Seven aid workers from the World Central Kitchen (WCK) were killed on Monday after a convoy they were travelling in was hit as it was leaving a warehouse in Deir al Balah overnight.

The WCK named all seven aid workers who were killed by the Israeli strike, this evening.

Documents seen by Sky News suggest Mr Chapman, 57, had been due to leave the Palestinian territory on 1 April.

Research from Sky News’ data and forensics team suggests Mr Chapman was registered to enter the Palestinian territory on 22 March, with information from the Gaza General Crossings Authority showing he was put down as a security consultant.

The three British nationals were part of the WCK’s security team.

Nationals from Poland and Australia were also among those killed, as well as a dual citizen of the US and Canada, and a Palestinian who was driving the car they were all travelling in.

Middle East latest: Israel offers condolences after ‘tragic deaths’

The blood-stained British, Polish, and Australian passports of aid workers killed by Israel. Pic: AP
Image:
The blood-stained UK, Polish, and Australian passports of the volunteers. Pic: AP

It is believed the workers were helping to deliver aid that had arrived hours earlier on a ship from Cyprus at the time.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged that Israeli forces were responsible for the airstrike, saying there was a “tragic incident of an unintended strike of our forces on innocent people in the Gaza Strip”.

He added: “It happens in war, we check it to the end, we are in contact with the governments, and we will do everything so that this thing does not happen again.”

His comments came after Foreign Secretary Lord Cameron said he had spoken to Israel’s foreign minister, Israel Katz, to “underline that the deaths of WCK aid workers in Gaza, including three British nationals, are completely unacceptable”.

One of the vehicles the aid workers were travelling in. Pic: AP
Image:
One of the vehicles the aid workers were travelling in. Pic: AP

The aftermath of the airstrike in Deir al Balah, Gaza. Pic: Reuters
Image:
The aftermath of the airstrike in Deir al Balah, Gaza. Pic: Reuters

The IDF said it was carrying out a “thorough review at the highest levels to understand the circumstances of this tragic incident”.

In a statement, a spokesperson added: “The IDF makes extensive efforts to enable the safe delivery of humanitarian aid.”

WCK’s chief executive Erin Gore said the team of aid workers was “travelling in a deconflicted zone in two armoured cars branded with the WCK logo and a soft skin vehicle” when it was hit.

👉 Listen above then tap here to follow the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts 👈

Ms Gore added: “This is not only an attack against WCK, this is an attack on humanitarian organisations showing up in the most dire of situations where food is being used as a weapon of war.

“This is unforgivable.”

Read more:
Iran promises ‘harsh’ response after deaths of top commanders
Thousands stage anti-government protests in Israel

The WCK paid tribute to the aid workers
Image:
The WCK paid tribute to the aid workers

Australian World Central Kitchen (WCK) aid worker Lalzawmi 'Zomi' Frankcom. Pic: World Central Kitchen via Reuters
Image:
Lalzawmi ‘Zomi’ Frankcom was also killed. Pic: World Central Kitchen via Reuters

Alongside the three British nationals, four others were killed by the targeted Israeli strike

Lalzawmi ‘Zomi’ Frankcom

Melbourne-born Ms Frankcom was remembered as a brave and selfless woman who had spent the last five years working for the WCK.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese told Australian Broadcasting Corp: “We mourn this fine Australian who has a record of helping out her fellow citizens.

Follow Sky News on WhatsApp
Follow Sky News on WhatsApp

Keep up with all the latest news from the UK and around the world by following Sky News

Tap here

“She is someone who clearly was concerned about her fellow humanity.”

Relatives described the 43 year old as an “outstanding human being” who was “killed doing the work she loves delivering food to the people of Gaza”.

Saifeddin Issam Ayad Abutaha, 25,
Image:
Saifeddin Issam Ayad Abutaha, 25,

Saifeddin Issam Ayad Abutaha

The 27-year-old Palestinian was identified by relatives and hospital workers.

According to his brother Ahmed Abutaha, he had worked for the WCK as a driver since the start of the year.

Another brother told the New York Times Mr Abutaha had been so excited to distribute the desperately needed food it was “like they were going to a wedding”.

A mourner reacts next to the bodies of employees from the World Central Kitchen (WCK) non-governmental organization, including foreigners, who were killed in an Israeli airstrike according to the Hamas-run Gaza government media office but the Israeli military said it was conducting a thorough review at the highest levels to understand the circumstances of this "tragic" incident, at Al-Aqsa hospital in Deir Al-Balah, in the central Gaza Strip April 1, 2024. REUTERS/Ramadan Abed
Image:
A mourner reacts next to the bodies of volunteers from the WCK. Pic: Reuters

Damian Sobol

Hailing from the Polish city of Przemysl, the 36 year old had spent the past six months in Gaza after working across the globe on aid missions.

Damian Sobol. Pic Reuters
Image:
Damian Sobol was described as ‘really extraordinary’. Pic Reuters

Posting on Facebook, Przemyśl mayor Wojciech Bakun said there are “no words to describe how people who knew this fantastic young man feel now”.

Marta Wilczynska, of the Free Place Foundation, met and worked with Mr Sobol after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. He said: “He was a really extraordinary guy. We were very proud of him.”

Jacob Flickinger

Jacob Flickinger, 33, was part of the relief team
Image:
Jacob Flickinger, 33, was part of the relief team

The 33-year-old dual US and Canadian citizen was part of the relief team working to bring aid to Gazans in need.

Continue Reading

UK

PM ‘appalled’ at Met Police ‘openly Jewish’ exchange – but Sadiq Khan has full confidence in commissioner

Published

on

By

PM 'appalled' at Met Police 'openly Jewish' exchange - but Sadiq Khan has full confidence in commissioner

Sadiq Khan has full confidence in Met Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley despite him facing calls to quit over the force’s handling of a recent pro-Palestine protest, Sky News understands.

It comes as a government source said Rishi Sunak was “appalled” at the incident – in which an officer was captured on video calling a man “openly Jewish”.

Energy Secretary Claire Coutinho told Sky News that the incident in London was “completely wrong” and that “what happens next” with regard to Sir Mark was a “matter for the Labour London mayor”.

A spokesperson for the London mayor said: “Everybody must feel safe going about in London wherever they please. The way the original incident was dealt with by the Met was concerning and the original response put out by them was insensitive and wrong.

“The Met have an extremely difficult job – particularly so when it comes to operational decisions taken while policing marches.

“But in the end the Met must have the confidence of the communities they serve and it is right that they have apologised for the way the incident was handled and their original public response.”

Read more:
Met Police chief stuck in middle of policing and politics – analysis

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Coutinho: Met has ‘got it wrong’

Sky News understands that Sir Mark does still retain the confidence of Mr Khan, who as mayor has the power to effectively sack the commissioner – but can only do so with the permission of the home secretary, who can also require the mayor to dismiss the head of the Met.

Mr Rowley, who replaced Cressida Dick as Met commissioner in 2022, is facing calls to quit following the officer’s interaction with Gideon Falter, the chief executive of the Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In the video, an officer appears to prevent Mr Falter from crossing the road and tells him: “You are quite openly Jewish. This is a pro-Palestinian march. I am not accusing you of anything, but I am worried about the reaction to your presence.”

Mr Falter, who was wearing a yarmulke and said he was simply walking past after attending synagogue, was then threatened with arrest if he did not leave the area.

He told Sky News that Londoners cannot have confidence in the Met under Sir Mark’s leadership and accused the commissioner of “victim blaming” following the incident, for which he has received two apologies.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

New video of ‘openly Jewish’ row

Mr Falter was joined in his call for Sir Mark to go by former home secretary Suella Braverman, who said there had been “failure after failure by the Met” over the last six months.

In an interview with Sunday Morning with Trevor Phillips, Ms Coutinho repeatedly declined to say whether Sir Mark should quit following the incident, but said what happened was “completely wrong”.

“It’s not right that one group of people in society should be told they can’t go around their daily lives because it might be a provocation to someone else,” she said.

“That’s not how equality works in this country.

“So I do think they’ve got it wrong. I think it’s right that they’ve apologised, and ultimately, what happens next is a matter for the Labour London Mayor who has the responsibility to hold the Met to account.”

Read more:
Sunak pledges to keep child benefit cap
Truss refuses to apologise for sparking mortgage rate rise

On Sunday morning, the Board of Deputies of British Jews said it would meet Sir Mark following “a series of high-profile errors” regarding its policing of pro-Palestinian marches.

“The entirely avoidable mistakes have had a devastating effect on the previously high level of trust held by the UK’s Jewish community in the police”, a statement from the group read.

As well as the Board of Deputies, Sir Mark will meet the Jewish Leadership Council and Community Security Trust (CST) next Thursday. The Campaign Against Antisemitism has told Sky News it is not attending the meeting.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Met resignation is ‘not the way forward’

Labour’s shadow justice secretary Shabana Mahmood said the Met had “not covered themselves in glory” over the incident with Mr Falter but that she did not agree with calls for Sir Mark to resign.

“I can understand the strength of feeling and as I say that footage was very concerning, and I can understand where Mr Falter is coming from,” she told Sunday Morning with Trevor Phillips.

“But I don’t think that the resignation of the Met’s commissioner is the way forward.”

Continue Reading

UK

Sky News footage reveals new details of exchange between police and antisemitism campaigner called ‘openly Jewish’

Published

on

By

Sky News footage reveals new details of exchange between police and antisemitism campaigner called 'openly Jewish'

A tense, extended stand-off between police and an antisemitism campaigner where he was called “openly Jewish” and threatened with arrest yards from a pro-Palestinian march was caught on film by Sky News.

The footage gives context to the lengthy and fraught exchanges amid an increasingly volatile atmosphere, as the head of the Metropolitan Police faces calls to resign following the incident.

Scotland Yard has already had to apologise twice after a short video clip emerged on social media, where Gideon Falter, chief executive of the Campaign Against Antisemitism, was blocked by an officer close to the protest in the Aldwych area of London on Saturday 13 April.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Original clip: Jewish man prevented crossing Gaza march

An initial apology by Met assistant commissioner Matt Twist had to be retracted after it suggested the presence of Mr Falter, who was wearing a kippah skull cap, was “provocative”, leading to a rebuke from the Home Office.

In the Sky News footage, the activist insisted he was only trying to cross the road down which the demonstration was passing, but this is disputed by an officer in the new footage, who said Mr Falter had deliberately walked head-on into the crowd and accused him of being “disingenuous” and seeking to “antagonise” the marchers.

Sky News has decided not to identify the officer.

Extended exchange

As emotions continue to run high over the Israel-Hamas war in Gaza, the Sky News footage shows a Met police sergeant explaining to Mr Falter that it was a “big demonstration” and barring his way to the march.

When Mr Falter asked if it was because he is Jewish, the officer nods and says “unfortunately”.

The officer said: “Unfortunately, sir you took it upon yourself to go from the pavement right into the middle of a pro-Palestinian march, which is why I asked you to go away.”

He added: “You are looking to try and antagonise this.”

“So I can already see what your mindset is, sir.”

Read more on Sky News:
Sadiq Khan has confidence in Met Police chief
Truss refuses to apologise for sparking mortgage rate rise

Taking issue with this, Mr Falter said: “My mindset? My mindset is I am Jewish in London and I can walk where I want.”

The officer then said: “Please don’t be too disingenuous sir.”

Mr Falter said: “I am not being disingenuous, I can walk wherever the hell I want.

“If I want to walk to that pavement that is what I am going to do and you are going to have to arrest me.”

The officer said: “I would rather not do that.”

Mr Falter said: “I want to get out of here, I want to go across there.”

The officer then said: “I tell you what, come with me, let’s get you out of here. If that’s what you want, come on.

“I am going to get you out over here, you are going to have to do the long way – there are so many people.”

Mr Falter said: “Why can’t I just walk where I want to walk?”

The officer said: “Because there is a big demonstration.”

He added: “I will walk you out and then you can go. You can see all the Israeli flags over there, I will walk you over there.”

Mr Falter said: “I don’t walk with the Israeli flags or any flags.”

The officer replied: “I am not asking you to walk with them but that is the route I will take you out.”

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

‘Time for Mark Rowley to go’

Asking the officer “to listen to me for a second”, Mr Falter said: “The Metropolitan Police says that these marches are completely safe for Jews, there is no problem whatsoever.

“You are telling me that I cannot walk to the other pavement. That I have to be escorted by you.”

The officer said: “I am telling you that I will help you by escorting you over there and that way you will be completely safe just as we promised, so we are keeping our word.”

Mr Falter said: “I am only safe basically if I have a police escort, is that what you are telling me?”

The officer said: “I am offering it to you sir.

“I have already seen you deliberately leave the pavement and walk against this march. You chose to do that.”

Mr Falter said: “I was trying to get to the other side of the road.”

Amid the ongoing exchange, the noisy march continued in the background with protesters carrying placards and chanting “Palestine will be free.”

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Met resignation is ‘not the way forward’

‘Antagonise’

After several more exchanges, Mr Falter asked if it was because he was Jewish he was being stopped from crossing the road as it would “antagonise” the crowd.

The officer said: “You are quite obviously Jewish in appearance, you are outwardly demonstrating your faith.”

He added: “You decided to walk out into the road… and deliberately walk against the flow of people.

“This is quite clearly a pro-Palestinian demonstration. My concern is that your behaviour changed.

“You were at first on the footway, you were not causing any issues. You then decided to move into the road, not to cross it but walk against the flow of people.”

Mr Falter said: “What are you talking about? I was walking across the road.”

The officer then said: “I am sorry, which word didn’t you understand? You were walking against the flow of people.

“That’s why I asked you to move to the pavement.”

When Mr Falter asked if he would be allowed to cross the road if he removed his kippah, the officer said he would not because he was not confident he would not put it back on.

Someone unidentified can then be heard to say: “You are going round in circles now lads.”

Threat of arrest

The campaigner then spoke to another officer who said if he remained he would be arrested.

He was told his presence was “antagonising” a large group of people “and we can’t deal with all of that if they attack you”.

The officer said: “You deliberately tried to walk through the group.

“I watched what you did, you were walking through them in a straight line.”

Pointing away from the march, the officer added: “When you have a route here that offers you no resistance whatsoever it is an antagonistic action to take.”

Mr Falter restated he would like to cross the road as someone could be heard to shout “baby killers”.

He again moved to the pavement, where protesters had gathered with flags and placards, leading a police officer to put a restraining arm around him.

As well as chants of “Palestine will be free” there were also shouts of “shame on you” and “scum”.

The original police sergeant asked Mr Falter: “Where are you looking to go now? You are still heading the wrong way.”

As the situation appeared to grow even more volatile, the officer repeated his offer to escort Mr Falter away as he continued to remonstrate with police arguing they had failed to deal with protesters “behaving badly”.

Pro-Palestinian protesters, some of them masked, chanted at Mr Falter: “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

The chant is viewed by some pro-Israel supporters as a way to call for the eradication of the Israeli state. Some pro-Palestinian supporters reject this, saying it is simply expressing the need for equality for all inhabitants of historic Palestine.

Continue Reading

UK

Police investigating after man and woman in 70s found dead in Stoke-on-Trent

Published

on

By

Police investigating after man and woman in 70s found dead in Stoke-on-Trent

Police are investigating after a man and a woman in their 70s were found dead at a house in Stoke-on-Trent.

Officers were called to a report of two bodies found at a property on Catalina Place, Meir Park, at 1pm on Saturday, Staffordshire Police said.

They were pronounced dead at 2.15pm.

Staffordshire Police said: “An investigation is being carried out to establish the circumstances of the incident.

“At this stage, we are confident there is no wider threat or risk to the community.”

The man and woman have not been publicly named.

Read more from Sky News:
Head of Met Police should resign, says antisemitism campaigner
Three men who died in north London car crash named
Wales to roll back 20mph speed limit on some roads after backlash

Follow Sky News on WhatsApp
Follow Sky News on WhatsApp

Keep up with all the latest news from the UK and around the world by following Sky News

Be the first to get Breaking News

Install the Sky News app for free


Their family are being supported by specialist officers.

Continue Reading

Trending