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White and mixed ethnic groups do not live as long as other ethnic groups on average, a government study has suggested.

Experimental data from the Office for National Statistics found that between 2011 and 2014, people from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds in England and Wales had a lower life expectancy at birth than all other ethnic groups.

People from black African backgrounds were expected to live longer than most other groups.

Men from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds had the lowest life expectancy. Source: ONS
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Men from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds had the lowest life expectancy. Source: ONS

White people were also more likely to die of cancer than black or Asian people, the analysis showed.

Women tended to live longer than men across all ethnic groups.

For both sexes, death from coronary heart disease was highest among Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Indian people, and lowest among black ethnic groups.

Julie Stanborough, deputy director health analysis and life events, said: “These results reveal important patterns in life expectancy and mortality by ethnic group which are complex, but nevertheless consistent with most previous studies.”

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“Further research is required to investigate the reasons for the differences,” she added.

She said potential explanations for differences in mortality include past migration patterns, the socioeconomic composition of the groups, health-related behaviours, and clinical and biological factors.

This is the first time the ONS has produced these experimental statistics, which are still being tested and are not yet fully developed.

Women from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds had the lowest life expectancy. Source: ONS
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Women from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds had the lowest life expectancy. Source: ONS

The data is based on an analysis of 50,189,388 records from the 2011 census, which were linked to death registrations.

White men were expected to live until nearly 80, while men from mixed ethnic groups were expected to live over 79 years.

For women from white and mixed ethnic backgrounds, the figure was 83 years.

White men were more likely to die of cancer. Source: ONS
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White men were more likely to die of cancer. Source: ONS

Black African women were expected to live nearly 89 years, with the number dropping to close to 84 years for their male counterparts.

Potential reasons for the higher life expectancy found in the black African and Asian ethnic groups include that they contain a higher proportion of more recent migrants than other ethnic groups, with other research finding that migrants tend to be healthier than other people.

Another contributing factor could be that white people are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol.

White women were more likely to die of cancer. Source: ONS
Image:
White women were more likely to die of cancer. Source: ONS

The study said more research is needed to understand whether living in a deprived neighbourhood has an impact.

Its authors noted that the pandemic may change the figures due to the disproportionate impact it has had on ethnically diverse communities.

The study analysed 1,303,274 deaths that occurred between 27 March 2011 – the day of the 2011 census – and 26 March 2014.

About 95% of people who were counted in the 2011 census were included in the analysis.

Because the death registration process in England and Wales does not collect information about the deceased’s ethnic group, linking death registrations to the census is currently the most reliable way of studying mortality by ethnic group.

The ONS defined mixed ethnic groups as white and black Caribbean, white and black African, white and Asian, and ‘other mixed or multiple ethnic backgrounds’.

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Lee Anderson suspended from Conservative Party after ‘Islamophobic’ comments

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Lee Anderson has been suspended from the Conservative party after ‘Islamophobic’ comments.

A spokesperson for Chief Whip Simon Hart said: “Following his refusal to apologise for comments made yesterday, the Chief Whip has suspended the Conservative whip from Lee Anderson MP.”

Speaking on GB News this week, Mr Anderson, MP for Ashfield, said: “I don’t actually believe that the Islamists have got control of our country, but what I do believe is they’ve got control of Khan and they’ve got control of London… He’s actually given our capital city away to his mates.”

Earlier today Sadiq Khan accused the prime minister of being “complicit” in racism for failing to condemn Mr Anderson‘s comments that “pour fuel on the fire of anti-Muslim hatred”.

Mr Khan said the claim by the former deputy chairman of Tory party were Islamophobic and sent the message that Muslims were “fair game” when it came to racism.

The remarks prompted criticism from Labour and some Tories, including former cabinet minister Sajid Javid who branded them “ridiculous”.

This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly.

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King Charles shown chuckling at get well card featuring dog in a head cone

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King Charles shown chuckling at get well card featuring dog in a head cone

The King has been shown having a chuckle at cards sent by well-wishers, including one of a dog with the caption “at least you don’t have to wear a cone!”.

The 75-year-old monarch has been sent around 7,000 messages of support from around the world since his cancer diagnosis.

Newly released images and footage show King Charles looking through some of them at his desk in Buckingham Palace’s Belgian Suite.

King Charles III reads cards and messages, sent by wellwishers following his cancer diagnosis.
Pic:PA
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The photos show the King in Buckingham Palace’s Belgian Suite. Pic: PA

He seemed particularly tickled by a card featuring an illustration of a terrier-like dog in a head cone, recovering from medical treatment.

Pets often wear plastic collars after an operation, to stop them aggravating a wound or stitches.

Other cards spread out in front of the King include one that reads “Your Majesty Get Well Soon”, while a number appear to be hand-drawn by children.

Many have related their own experience of cancer, with messages such as: “Chin up, chest out, remain positive and don’t let it get you down.”

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“Never give up. Be brave. Don’t push your limits. Get Well Soon,” says one note from a child.

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Messages ‘reduced me to tears’

The King was pictured reading the cards on Wednesday – the same day he met the prime minister for their weekly audience.

He told Rishi Sunak that he’d been “reduced to tears” by the public’s support.

The monarch was speaking to Mr Sunak in their first face-to-face meeting since it was announced he had a “form of cancer”.

“I’ve had so many wonderful messages and cards, it has reduced me to tears most of the time,” King Charles told the prime minister.

He added: “I hear there has been a lot more potential attention on those main, wonderful cancer charities, many of which I have been a patron of for years.”

The King had been mostly staying at the Sandringham estate in Norfolk following his first round of treatment in London.

Buckingham Palace announced on 5 February that cancer had been discovered while undergoing a procedure for an enlarged prostate.

The Palace has not released details about the type of cancer or the treatment.

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Professional golfer Georgia Ball can ‘see the funny side’ after ‘mansplaining’ TikTok video goes viral

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Professional golfer Georgia Ball can 'see the funny side' after 'mansplaining' TikTok video goes viral

Professional female golfer Georgia Ball has said she can “see the funny side” after a video of an amateur player “mansplaining” to her about her swing went viral.

Ball, a certified PGA pro and instructor, also told Sky Sports she did not put the man in his place during the “awkward” conversation because she is a “humble person”.

The TikTok video of the incident she shared earlier this week has had more than 10 million views and over 26,000 comments, with many social media users mocking the man for “mansplaining”.

In the clip, Ball, who regularly shares instructional videos on her account, is seen practising her swing at a driving range near Liverpool.

A man off camera then says: “Excuse me, what you’re doing there, you shouldn’t be doing that… swing and follow through.”

He goes on to tell her that she is “too slow on the way up”.

Ball explains she is going through a “swing change” – something golfers regularly do to improve their technique.

However, the man continues: “I know, but what you’re doing there is you’re coming back too slow.

“I’ve been playing golf for 20 years, what you need to do is follow through a lot quicker than what you’re doing there right now.”

She explains again that she is going through a swing change, but the man continues to advise that she needs to move her club quicker.

Ball then cleanly strikes the ball into the distance before the man says: “See how much better that was?”

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The professional golfer explains once again that she is practising a swing change, before the man repeats that he “has been playing for 20 years” and that she should carry on playing the way he has advised her to.

Ball then laughs, before sarcastically adding: “Thanks for your advice.”

Asked by Sky Sports how she felt during the interaction, Ball said: “It was an awkward conversation at the time but I was just concentrating on what I was doing… I am glad I can look back on it now and see the funny side to it.”

When asked if she was ever tempted to put the man in his place, she said: “To be honest, I am a humble person, it is not in me to call him out or say I am a PGA pro, it is just not in me to do that.”

Ball added that she never got the chance to see the man hit a ball, so was unable to pass comment on his swing.

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