Connect with us

Published

on

Israel’s parliament has voted in favour of a new government, ending Benjamin Netanyahu’s 12-year consecutive tenure as premier.

The vote was 60-59.

Earlier, Mr Netanyahu had vowed to lead his Likud Party back to power and “topple this dangerous government and return to lead the country in our way”.

He made clear he had no plans to relinquish leadership of the right-wing Likud party. He will therefore become leader of the opposition.

Party leaders of the new coalition government posed for a picture at the Knesset, Israel's parliament, before the start of a special session to approve and swear-in the coalition government, in Jerusalem
Image:
The coalition likely to take government comprises eight groups, including the first faction to represent in government Israel’s Arab minority

The new administration, comprising an unprecedented coalition of parties from across the spectrum, won the vote of confidence in the 120-seat Knesset.

The vote ended a record term of 12 consecutive years for the Israel prime minster, as well as a turbulent two years of politics that saw four elections, an economically devastating coronavirus outbreak and an 11-day conflict in Gaza in May.

Ultra-nationalist Naftali Bennett, a hi-tech millionaire and Orthodox Jew, is to replace Netanyahu in a power-sharing deal with centrist leader Yair Lapid. Mr Lapid, a former TV host, will take over as PM in 2023 for a further two years.

More on Benjamin Netanyahu

The new government has pledged to heal a nation bitterly divided over the departure of Mr Netanyahu, the most dominant Israeli politician of his generation.

These divisions were evident as Mr Bennett was heckled by supporters of Mr Netanyahu in a raucous session of parliament.

Addressing the Knesset ahead of the vote, Mr Bennett vowed to fight US efforts to revive the Iran nuclear deal, a continuation of Mr Netanyahu’s confrontational policy.

A special session of the Knesset, Israel's parliament, to approve and swear-in a new coalition government, in Jerusalem
Image:
A special session of the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, was convened to approve and swear-in a new coalition government

“Israel will not allow Iran to arm itself with nuclear weapons,” he said. “Israel will not be a party to the agreement and will continue to preserve full freedom of action.”

The ruling coalition looks unlike any before in the country’s 73-year history. It contains parties with extreme ideological differences, including for the first time a party that represents Israel’s 21% Arab minority, Raam.

The leaders are expected to steer clear of drastic moves on international issues such as policy on Palestine, focussing instead on domestic reforms.

Drone footage shows the scale of destruction left across Gaza City after 11 days of fighting.
Image:
Drone footage shows the scale of destruction in Gaza City after 11 days of fighting in May

But the coalition’s fragile majority means that it could collapse even if just one of the eight factions splintered. The groups are united in little more than their opposition to Mr Netanyahu.

Mr Netanyahu, 71, had failed to form a government after an election on 23 March, the fourth in two years. His fate was effectively sealed on 2 June, when eight groups with the 61 seats required for a majority signed an agreement.

His trial on charges of bribery, fraud and breach of trust – allegations which he denies – continues.

Continue Reading

World

Jerusalem: Boy, 13, suspected of ‘terror attack’ hours after gunman killed seven outside synagogue

Published

on

By

Jerusalem: Boy, 13, suspected of 'terror attack' hours after gunman killed seven outside synagogue

Two people have been wounded in a suspected terror attack in Jerusalem, hours after a deadly shooting outside a synagogue.

Israel’s national emergency medical and ambulance service said it was called to a “shooting terror attack” in the Palestinian neighbourhood of Silwan, in east Jerusalem, on Saturday morning.

Police say they sent a “large” force to the scene and that a “shooting suspect”, said to be a 13-year-old boy from east Jerusalem, was “wounded and overpowered”.

Officers said a handgun used by the boy, described by police as a “terrorist”, was recovered at the scene.

Two men, aged 23 and 47, and believed to be a father and son, were wounded in the incident. They were both taken to hospital in a “moderate to serious” condition, according to medics.

It comes after a Palestinian gunman shot seven people dead near a synagogue on the outskirts of the city on Friday.

Three others were injured in that shooting, including a 15-year-old boy who was recovering from surgery, hospital officials said.

Israel Police tweeted this image of a gun they say was used in an attack by a 13-year-old boy in Maalot Ir David in Jerusalem on Saturday, 28 January. Two people were injured in the attack before the suspect was "neutralised". Pic: Israel Police
Image:
A handgun Israel Police say was used in the attack. Pic: Israel Police

Police said the gunman arrived at about 8.15pm local time (6.15pm UK time) and described the shooting as a “terror attack”.

They added it took place outside a synagogue in Neve Yaakov, considered by Israelis to be a neighbourhood within Jerusalem.

Palestinians and much of the international community consider it occupied land illegally annexed after the Six-Day War in 1967.

Israeli security personnel work near a scene where a suspected incident of shooting attack took place, police spokesman said, just outside Jerusalem's Old City January 28, 2023. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Image:
Israeli security personnel at the scene

Police said the gunman fled in a car after opening fire and officers gave chase and after an exchange of fire killed him.

He was described as a 21-year-old resident of east Jerusalem who “carried out the attack at the scene alone”.

Israel Police said on Saturday that officers had arrested 42 people – including relatives of the gunman – as part of their investigation.

Read more:
Palestinian militants ‘ready to die’ as chance of all-out war increases
Israel’s most far-right government hardens policies towards Palestinians

Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he had held a security assessment and decided on “immediate actions” following Friday’s shooting.

Mr Netanyahu urged people not to take the law into their own hands and said Israel would act with “determination and composure”.

Israeli forces work at the scene of the shooting in Neve Yaakov
Image:
Israeli forces work at the scene of the shooting in Neve Yaakov

It comes after a deadly raid by the Israeli military on Thursday that killed nine Palestinians in the occupied West Bank. A 10th was later killed north of Jerusalem.

Gaza militants then fired rockets and Israel responded with air strikes overnight. There were no reports of injuries.

UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres was “deeply worried” by the escalation of violence and urged “utmost restraint”.

Continue Reading

World

Faction of Tory members feel ‘disconnected’ after being ‘denied a vote’ when Rishi Sunak became PM, ex-party chair says

Published

on

By

Faction of Tory members feel 'disconnected' after being 'denied a vote' when Rishi Sunak became PM, ex-party chair says

A proportion of Conservative members feel “disconnected” from the party as they were “denied a vote” when Rishi Sunak became prime minister, a former Tory chairman said.

Sir Jake Berry, who was chair under Liz Truss, said Mr Sunak should have held an “endorsement vote” to show he had the support of the membership.

Instead, Mr Sunak automatically became PM after Boris Johnson and Penny Mordaunt dropped out of the contest to replace Liz Truss and Mr Sunak passed the 100-nomination threshold, leaving him as the only remaining candidate.

As a result, there is a “perception”, Sir Jake said, that Tory MPs are “disconnected from our membership”.

Mr Sunak entered Downing Street just weeks after coming second to Ms Truss in the summer leadership contest after Tory members voted for her over him – despite MPs being in favour of him.

“I actually think it’s a great pity for Rishi Sunak that we didn’t have a vote of members,” Sir Jake told GB News.

“Because in the summer, fine Conservative that he is, he struggled actually to get the support of Conservative Party members – as, funnily enough, did Jeremy Hunt in the previous leadership election.

More on Conservatives

Minister without portfolio in the Cabinet Office Jake Berry during day three of the Conservative Party annual conference at the International Convention Centre in Birmingham. Picture date: Tuesday October 4, 2022.
Image:
Sir Jake Berry was party chairman under Liz Truss

“And I think even though he absolutely got the majority of the Conservative members of parliament – and I support him as prime minister in everything he does – the challenge he has is, even if it’s not true, there’s a perception of the Conservative Parliamentary Party now being disconnected from our membership.”

Read more:
Hunt dismisses economic ‘gloom’ as he dashes hopes of tax cuts
Sir Rod Stewart ‘reflected country’s mood’ when he called for Labour government

Sir Jake added that he thinks Mr Sunak “would have won it well” if a vote had gone to the membership.

But, he said a narrative has been allowed to develop about members being “denied that vote”.

Click to subscribe to the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts

‘War room’ in the dying days of Truss leadership

The former Northern Powerhouse minister revealed what the last days of the Truss premiership were like.

He was part of a “war room” in Number 10, with Ms Truss, ex-chief whip Wendy Morton and former deputy PM Therese Coffey who were all trying to stabilise her leadership after the now-infamous mini-budget.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Sunak becomes prime minister

Just before Ms Truss resigned, Sir Jake said “two of the most senior civil servants in the Treasury” tried to press him on “why there could be no long, protracted leadership election in the Conservative Party”.

“They asked me at the end of it, ‘Do you agree?’,” he said.

“And I said, ‘Well, I hope you don’t mind me saying, I don’t really think it’s any of your business, as civil servants, about how political parties choose their leader’.”

Continue Reading

World

Tyre Nichols: Bodycam footage shows father-of-one calling for his mother as he is beaten by officers before his death

Published

on

By

Tyre Nichols: Bodycam footage shows father-of-one calling for his mother as he is beaten by officers before his death

Memphis Police has released bodycam footage showing the moment Tyre Nichols called for his mother as he was beaten by five officers before he died.

The footage shows police beating the 29-year-old for three minutes while screaming profanities at him throughout the attack.

Police have released four separate videos cut into one hour-long clip, including police bodycam footage and footage from a CCTV camera.

Memphis police chief Cerelyn Davis asked for calm before the video footage was made public.

“I expect you to feel what the Nichols family feels,” she said. “I expect you to feel outrage in the disregard of basic human rights.”

Read more:
Arrest video is sickening indictment of policing that night

Five sacked officers, who are all black, have been charged with second-degree murder and other crimes, including assault, kidnapping, official misconduct and official oppression, over Mr Nichols’ death.

In the footage of the attack, one camera shows the initial police stop at an intersection in Memphis, Tennessee.

“I’m going to baton the f*** out of you,” one officer can be heard saying. His body camera shows him raise his baton while at least one other officer holds Mr Nichols.

After the first officer roughly pulls Mr Nichols out of his car, the FedEx worker can be heard saying “I didn’t do anything” as a group of officers begins to wrestle him to the ground.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Police ‘gang’ intent on confrontation

“Get on the ground!,” one officer yells, as another is heard shouting: “Tase him! Tase him!”

The father-of-one calmly replied soon after being wrestled to the pavement: “OK, I’m on the ground.”

Moments later, as the officers continue to shout, Mr Nichols says: “Man, I am on the ground.”

An officer yells: “Put your hands behind your back before I break your (expletive).”

Moments later an officer shouts: “Put your hands behind your back before I break them.”

“You guys are really doing a lot right now,” Mr Nichols says loudly to the officers. “I’m just trying to go home.”

“Stop, I’m not doing anything,” he yells moments later.

Tyre Nichols is seen beaten by police officers in video released by Memphis Police Department
Image:
Tyre Nichols is beaten by police officers in video released by Memphis Police Department

Pepper-sprayed and punched in face

The camera is briefly obscured and then Mr Nichols can be seen running as an officer fires a Taser at him. The officers then start chasing Mr Nichols.

After the beating, officers milled about for several minutes while Mr Nichols lay propped up against the car, then slumped onto the street.

In footage from one of the cameras, Mr Nichols is heard shouting for his mother while police attack him.

Mr Nichols is then pepper-sprayed and punched in the face.

He died on 10 January, three days after the violent arrest.

The five officers who have been charged are named Demetrius Haley, Desmond Mills Jr, Emmitt Martin III, Tadarrius Bean and Justin Smith.

Martin’s lawyer, William Massey, and Mills’ lawyer, Blake Ballin, said their clients would plead not guilty. Lawyers for Smith, Bean and Haley could not be reached.

Clockwise from top left: Officers Demetrius Haley, Justin Smith, Emmitt Martin III, Tadarrius Bean and Desmond Mills Jr have been sacked. Pic: Shelby County Sheriff's Office
Image:
Clockwise from top left: Officers Demetrius Haley, Justin Smith, Emmitt Martin III, Tadarrius Bean and Desmond Mills Jr have been sacked. Pic: Shelby County Sheriff’s Office

Officers were ‘ramped up’

Ms Davis said the officers were “already ramped up, at about a 10” during the initial stop.

She added the officers were “aggressive, loud, using profane language and probably scared Mr Nichols from the very beginning”.

The senior officer said: “We know something happened prior to this officer or these officers getting out of their vehicles… just knowing the nature of officers, it takes something to get them amped up, you know, like that. We don’t know what happened.

“All we know is the amount of force that was applied in this situation was over the top.”

Ms Davis also described the officers’ actions as “heinous, reckless and inhumane,” and said that her department has been unable to substantiate the reckless driving allegation that prompted the stop.

Tyre Nichols’ final words move us to ask important questions

Sometimes, there are no words.

Articulating the loss of a son can stretch the vocabulary in the best of times.

The family of Tyre Nichols find themselves in the absolute worst.

What words can convey how it feels to have a son, your son, battered to death on camera?

As hard as anyone tried at a news conference inside Mount Olive Cathedral in Memphis, maybe the job was done best by Tyre himself.

At the end of the video, he is heard to call out for his mother, three times.

They are his final words on footage that shows him becoming limp, unconscious and clearly in distress.

He was surrounded by police and other medical specialists who stood back rather than stepped in.

His final words were a plea to someone he knew would help, his mum, who lived three blocks from where he was beaten.

RowVaughn, Tyre’s mother, wasn’t aware of it until it emerged on the video. She only knows now because she’s been told – she can’t bring herself to watch the images.

“You have no clue how I feel,” she told a news conference when asked about her son calling out for her.

And, of course, we don’t.

But we are asked to consider how we would feel – by the sense of helplessness and lack of humanity aggravated by the desperate cry of a grown man to his mother.

It helps an audience empathise, as well as sympathise, and that’s important amidst the demands for change.

The case of Tyre Nichols moves us to ask important questions around police culture in the United States.

Demonstrations in wake of arrest footage

Protests are taking place in at least nine cities across the US – including Memphis – after the bodycam footage was released.

Mr Nichols’ mother, RowVaughn Wells, had earlier warned supporters of the “horrific” nature of the video but pleaded for peace saying “tearing up the streets” is “not what my son stood for”.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

‘They killed a man who looked like me’

US President Joe Biden said he was “outraged and deeply pained to see the horrific video of the beating that resulted in Tyre Nichols’ death”

“It is yet another painful reminder of the profound fear and trauma, the pain, and the exhaustion that black and brown Americans experience every single day,” he added.

Continue Reading

Trending